Portrush Aircraft Profile day 3 – Mig 15, Catalina & Global Stars

A day late, sorry. Time got away from me yesterday. Day 4 coming later today/

Welcome to day 3 of our Airwaves Portrush 2018 preview which will today cover a Soviet fighter jet, a fantsatic aerobatic display team and and a former Canadian Air Force flying boat.

First up, making a welcome return to is the PBY Catalina flying boat.

PBY Catalina G-PBYA ‘Miss Pick-up’ run by the Plane Sailing Air Displays Limited who are based out of Duxford, England.

The Consolidated PBY Catalina is an American flying boat, and later an amphibious aircraft of the 1930s and 1940s produced by Consolidated Aircraft.

The Catalina was one of the most widely used seaplanes of World War II. Catalinas served with every branch of the United States Armed Forces and in the air forces and navies of many other nations.

During World War II, PBYs were used in anti-submarine warfare, patrol bombing, convoy escorts, search and rescue missions.

G-PBYA – The aircraft that will fly in Portrush was originally ordered for the Royal Canadian Air Force as a Canso. An amphibian, equivalent to the US Navy PBY-5A. It was built by Canadian Vickers at Cartierville, Quebec and was allocated their constructors number CV-283 before adopting the RCAF serial 11005. It was taken on charge by the air force on 27 October 1943 and initially saw service with 9 Squadron.

After the war she entered a period of storage at Moose Jaw before being converted to a freighter in 1948. Since then she has changed hands quite a few times working as a freighter and even as a water bomber in the Province of Saskatchewan, Canada.

In 2004 she was bought by ‘Plane Sailing’ and brought to Duxford and in November of 2004 her registry was changed from C-FNJF to G-PBYA.

The Catalina is operated by Plane Sailing Air Displays Limited on behalf of Catalina Aircraft Limited which is made up of a number of shareholders. The enterprise is supported by its own ‘fan club’ – The Catalina Society. The Catalina displayed in Portrush last year. (Photo and information from Catalina Society Website )

 

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Adding some jet power to the display is the Mig 15.

The Norweigen Air Force Historic Squadron preserve, maintain and operate these historic aircraft and work hard to make them fly for many years to come. The Norwegian Air Force Historical Squadron has established it’s own Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) authorized maintenance organization maintaining the jets.

They have displayed at all major airshows in Norway. In they are building quite a following having attended many shows in recent years. They displayed the Vampire pair last September in Portrush after the Mig 15 had technical issues.

Their experienced technicians are all voluntary, and help with a vast knowledge and expertise. Some are retired Norwegian Air Force (RNoAF) technicians with more than 40 years of experience on fighters including, Spitfires, Vampires, T-33, F-84, RF-84, F-86, F-104, F-5, RF-5 and F-16.

This aircraft is a Polish-built SB Lim-2 (MiG-15UTI), produced by WSK-Mielec in 1952. The aircraft is operated by the Norwegian Air Force Historical Squadron as a representative of the Cold War ‘enemy’.

Following its Polish Air Force service ending in 1990, the aircraft was exported to the USA, and based at Quillayute Airport just outside Forks, Washington. It was again returned to Europe in the summer of 2014. Experienced ex. Polish Air Force MiG-15 engineers carry out the maintenance of the aircraft.

Given the shared border between north-eastern Norway and Russia, and the many encounters between Royal Norwegian Air Force and Soviet aircraft during the Cold War, the Polish MiG is an appropriate addition to the Norwegian Air Force Historical Squadron.

The aircraft is painted and marked as “RED 18” to represent Russian-Soviet pilot and cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin’s MiG-15. He was the first human to journey into outer space in 1961. Before his cosmonaut training Yuri Alekseyevich Gagarin was stationed close to the Norwegian boarder and only 40 km from the Norwegian city of Kirkenes as a fighter pilot flying the MiG-15.

The prototype MiG-15 first flew 30. December 1947 and was series produced in the USSR between 1949 and 1959 in 13,131 examples. Foreign license production in Poland, Czechoslovakia and China reached about 6,000 examples. Total production of MiG-15 about 18,000 examples built. (Photo from Norwegian Air force Historical Squadron)

 

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And finally the Global Stars will be making their debut at Airwaves Portrush 2018.

The Global Stars are a team of British aerobatic champions past and present flying air shows World over. All aircraft carry the new “dotty smoke” systems adding to the dynamic nature of the air show. The display is very dynamic with a short solo by Mark Jefferies or Tom Cassells (both British Champions) keeping the action right in front of the crowd.

in 2012 the Global Stars were formed by Mark Jefferies with Tom Cassells as his wing-man.

The Global Stars team provide spectacular formation air displays or solo air displays. For 2016 Mark has purchased the very latest, highest performance certified aircraft the EXTRA 330SC. The team have flown many flying displays and air shows around the World in recent years.

Mark Jefferies has achieved great success and worldwide recognition as one of the most accomplished aviators in the UK; including 1st in Zhengzhou 2015 WAM, 3rd in the 2011 WAM, ranked 8th in the World in 2007 and 10th in the World 2009. Nine times British aerobatic champion (Advanced & Unlimited).

Mark bases his Extra 330SC at Little Gransden, Cambridgeshire (ICAO EGMJ) Gransden is a farm strip and has a main grass runway of 810 meters. The airfield is open to visitors either by road or by air. Gransden is the home of the Global Stars and as such, most likely you will find some aerobatic training taking place. Duel training in the Extra 300L or solo competition/air show training in the Extra 300s or 330sc.

The Aircraft

Extra 330sc

Extra 330SC (single competition) is the top of the range awesome aerobatic aircraft with +10/-10 G limits. G-IIHI, it is one of the first of its type to be built, its serial number is 008 and it is entirely in a class of its own. It is fitted with the newly certified Lycoming AE10-580 engine which has been specifically developed for high performance aerobatic aircraft. The engine produces an impressive 320hp (580 cubic inches but only turning at 2700 rpm) which when you consider there is no ground resistance, is quite incredible.

Its maximum diving speed is 418 km/h and it has an incredibly fast roll rate of 420 degrees per second. If the weather conditions are right, the aircraft can be seen to hover and in the right hands, it really does performs manoeuvres that should not be possible!
Mark Jefferies is one of the few pilots that can fly this aircraft to its limits! As well as its sporty paint scheme,

the Extra 330SC has a unique smoke system fitted which enables smoke to be “pulsed” out, offering something different to air show audiences.

With the latest technology cameras fitted to the aircraft, live footage can be transmitted to trackside screens giving the audience a bird’s eye view of the event. Cameras can be fitted anywhere on the aircraft, including inside the cockpit which gives a very interesting perspective of the world. Footage can be given directly to TV news channels to report on and promote the event or can be used later for promotional material.

Extra 300L

The Extra Flugzeugbau EA300 is a two-seat aerobatic monoplane capable of Unlimited category competition. It was designed in 1987 by Walter Extra, an award-winning German aerobatic pilot and built by Extra Flugzeugbau.

Design of the Extra 300 was based on the Extra 230, an early 1980s monoplane having a wing made of wood. The Extra 300 has a welded steel tube fuselage covered in aluminium and fabric.

The mid-set wing has a carbon fiber composite spar and carbon composite skins. A symmetrical airfoil, mounted with a zero angle of incidence, provides equal performance in both upright and inverted flight. The landing gear is fixed taildragger style with composite main legs and fiberglass wheel pants.

The engine is a fuel-injected Lycoming AEIO-540 which produces 300 horsepower (224 kW). The first two-seat Extra 300 made its maiden flight on 6 May 1988 with German type certification following on 16 May 1990. The single seat Extra 300S flew on 4 March 1992. The Extra 300 is stressed for ±10 G with one person on board and ±8 G with two.

Cap 232

The CAP Aviation CAP-23x family is a family of high-performance aircraft designed for competition aerobatics. The CAP 230 airframe was a direct development of the CAP 21 competition single seater strengthened to cope with a 300 hp 6-cylinder Lycoming AEIO-540 engine instead of the 200 hp original 4-cylinder Lycoming AEIO-360.

The CAP 230 was primarily developed in 1985 for the French Air Force. From the basic CAP 21 airframe, trailing edge apex triangular surfaces were added to the basic trapezoidal wing. The CAP 230 keeps a full wooden construction and certified to cope with +10/-10 G-forces. The CAP 231 was developed in 1990.

The fuselage design remained unchanged and only leading edge triangular apex surfaces were added to reduce buffeting during high G pullups. The CAP 231 was world champion in 1990. To increase performance, in 1991, a carbon-fiber wing taken from an EXTRA 260 (thus the -EX name) was adapted to a few CAP 231 airframes.

The CAP 231EX evolved in 1994. While the fuselage construction retained wood, a carbon-fiber wing was specially designed for durability and light weight. The design has won the World Championships in 1998, 2000 and 2007, as well as a number of other national-level competitions. With a roll rate of 420° per second and a climb rate of nearly 3,300 feet per minute, the CAP-232 is still well suited for the aerobatic circuit.

 

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come back tomorrow for yet more aircraft profiles in the lead up to Airwaves Portrush

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